What We’re Reading This Week: September 29, 2016

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Here’s what’s been on the Edible editors’ radar this week.

Watch the trailer for new documentary The Missing Ingredient: What Is the Recipe for Success? about two neighborhood restaurants in New York City.

Fish sing like birds at dawn. New Scientist writes:
“The ocean might seem like a quiet place, but listen carefully and you might just hear the sounds of the fish choir. Most of this underwater music comes from soloist fish, repeating the same calls over and over. But when the calls of different fish overlap, they form a chorus.”

Roads & Kingdoms visited the fried chicken restaurant owned by suspected bomber Ahmad Khan Rahami’s family:
On that warm and humid Monday afternoon, the FBI and local police were carting items out of the restaurant to investigate potential ties to a terrorist attack, but the mood on the street outside wasn’t somber. Teens reacted casually to the news and were more excited about seeing a news crew from Pix11 on the scene than they were concerned about the controversy itself. Locals chattered about how cool it was to be featured on the news.”

Egg‘s Evan Hanczor gives LitHub “The Ultimate Literary Ten-Course Meal“:
“In cooking the TOC dinners at Egg, we’re consistently amazed by the power—creative, nostalgic, emotional—of translating text into food. If you’ve never cooked and eaten a dish from a favorite book, do it. Nearly any great book has moments of food in it, not just because characters have to eat, but because our relationship with food exposes so much about our identities, cultures, time, and place. What author forsakes a tool that can explore all that?”

At Edible East End, a look at how important women are to wine-making:
Years ago, winemakers’ daughters were groomed for sales or hospitality while sons followed their fathers into winemaking. Today, women are rising above old stereotypes and gaining positions of great importance in the wine industry. On the production side, more women than ever are making their presence felt as oenologists, wine makers, vineyards managers and cellar workers.”

Feet in 2 Worlds asked Mexican cooks what they make at home:
Before leaving Mexico for North Carolina, Oscar didn’t know how to flip a tortilla on the grill. Now, under the direction of a James Beard award-winning chef, he and fellow cooks Javier, Romeo and Ramiro run the line at the high-end Lantern Restaurant in Chapel Hill.”

Serious Eats on drinking in the Philippines:
“The tanggero is one of the most distinctive features of drinking in the Philippines, and it’s an important role. The tanggero makes sure that all the drinkers have their fill, that everyone gets their fair share. The drinkers return the favor by drinking bottoms up from the glass, in the custom known as tagay.”

Illustration credit: Lia Strasser

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Alicia Kennedy is a Long Island–born, Brooklyn-based food writer and recipe developer.