Dirty Boots Farm Offers a Fall CSA in Bay Ridge and Bushwick

You can still eat a dazzling array of local produce throughout autumn, like you live in Berkeley instead of Brooklyn.

dirty boots farm

The farm is called Dirty Boots, on a sustainable, 5.3-acre parcel of Black Dirt (capitalization theirs) in Chester, NY. Photo courtesy of Dirty Boots.

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It’s September, and maybe you’re a little sad. All those things you did this summer, the stoop-sitting, the grilled brats, the fading tans and remembered tacos, all of that is slipping away. Don’t be sad! You can still eat a dazzling array of local produce throughout autumn, like you live in Berkeley instead of Brooklyn.

A tiny Upstate farm — small enough that they’re concerned this article will overwhelm them — is doing Sunday CSA drops in Bay Ridge and Bushwick through mid-November. Sign up today and you’ll still get two and a half months of veggies!

The farm is called Dirty Boots, on a sustainable, 5.3-acre parcel of Black Dirt (capitalization theirs) in Chester, NY. It’s run by Matt Hunger and Shayna Lewis, a tireless young couple who are doing it all themselves.

Join now, eat like farm royalty. As the season progresses things will start to skew more hearty — braising greens, Brussels sprouts, parsnips, leeks, etc. — but you’ve still got time for tomatoes, cukes and the like.

Drops started in August, but Hunger and Lewis will pro-rate from whenever you sign up. Do it soon, though: Lewis says they’ll have to cap membership at some point.

Info on drop-off times and locations can be found on the Dirty Boots website, as well as handy information on sustainable farming and a cost comparison between CSAs and supermarkets. Another leg up on grocery stores — your cabbage and cauliflower won’t be coming from California.

And if you’re interested in a fall CSA that offers you week-to-week flexibility (at a price), check out this partnership between Rustic Roots Delivery and Union Market.

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Jesse Hirsch

Formerly the print editor of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan, Jesse Hirsch now works as the New York editor for GOOD magazine.