Credit: Marcus Nilsson

RECIPE: Fried Chicken and Deviled Eggs from Gather Journal

Don’t get us wrong, we love fall. Much anticipated apples and pears hang low while squash, corn and beans take front and center of the farmers market stage. But can you blame us for wanting to hold on to some summer dishes just a little longer?

Credit: Marcus Nilsson

Credit: Marcus Nilsson

Don’t get us wrong, we love fall. Apples and pears hang low while squash, corn and beans take front and center on the farmers market stage. But can you blame us for wanting to hold on to some summer dishes just a little longer?

Screen shot 2013-09-25 at 11.08.00 AM

Credit: Gather Journal

One of our favorite reads from this past season was Brooklyn based Gather Journal‘s “Rough Cut” issue. Maybe their startling covers have caught your eye on certain newsstands like they have ours, but for those of you who are not familiar with this lusciously designed publication, Gather offers themed collections of recipes, words and images. Most recently, their spring/summer issue took cinematic inspiration by featuring recipes derived from summer movie classics.

Their print issue is broken down into four courses (amuse bouche and cocktails, starters, mains and desserts) and two features that are dedicated to a couple of our favorite film directors: Hitchcock and Wes Anderson. Can you guess which legendary thriller inspired their “slashed black and blueberry pie” cover?

We are so taken by their work that we wanted to share a recipe that some may think is only for summer, but we could eat all year long: fried chicken and April Bloomfield’s deviled eggs  made in homage to “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”

With just the right amount of buttermilk, crème fraîche and oil to stick to your bones during the coming chilly months, we can’t think of better way to fulfill our seasonal desires… well, except for maybe eating fried chicken and deviled eggs at the same time as watching the Coen brothers’ classic.

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Ariel Lauren Wilson

After growing up on her family's farm in western North Carolina, Lauren has not wandered too far away from food and farming since she moved to New York. She comes to Brooklyn via Dijon, France and will never turn down a smear of Epoisses, cornbread, or a full-bodied cup of coffee.